Posts in category Learning to Learn

The Potential of a “C”: Developing a Growth Mindset

What we think about our ability to learn matters What we think about our ability to learn matters. Believing that we can only learn a fixed amount, or that others can only learn a fixed amount, does not offer anyone the opportunity to grow.  Without the belief that we can learn and grow, a “C” […]

Revealed: Twice Exceptional Learners

Twice exceptional learners may remain undiagnosed, by educational professionals including Speech Pathologist, because of their unique abilities in other areas. The language assessment in a neuropsychological battery and in some speech pathology tests often require only one-word or limited responses.

I Don’t Need Help! Problems of Adolescence

I Don’t Need Help! Problems of Adolescence

Even though teens and young adults often continue to have problems managing their language based learning disabilities in middle and high school, some are initially resistant to accepting help from specialist.

Vocabulary Development: Teachable Moments

I am holding up a bright yellow jacket at the LL Bean outlet in New Hampshire. “Hey look this is really bright it will be great for biking,” I say to my daughter. “No, it’s dull she says!” 

Unidentified: Twice Exceptional Children of Color

“I’m dumb!”  “I can’t learn!”  Often underserved in public schools, twice exceptional children of color,  especially children of color who are of African or Hispanic descent spend their entire academic career unidentified and underperforming. 

Learning disabilities: I can learn….

  Parents fear that their child’s language based learning disability will limit opportunities, but with additional supports like speech/language therapy this is not true.  

Dyslexia: Should you tell them?

Should you tell kids about their diagnosis

In the documentary called “Embracing Dyslexia,” a father asked the principal of his child’s school if he should tell his child that the child has dyslexia.  The principal says, “No!”

Yucky fiction!!! books books books

The value of reading fiction for people with Asperger Syndrome is that reading this genre offers them the opportunity to improve non-verbal skills, in spite of the fact that some people with Asperger Syndrome do not enjoy reading fictional books. 

Did I read that right?

Asperger Syndrome and reading comprehension In class Tim, a ninth grader was seen as an excellent student ( not his real name), and he received A’s in English.

Sensory Processing Disorder: Symptom of Autism

“I only eat Cheerios for breakfast.” says one of my clients on the autism spectrum.  People on the autism spectrum often have reduced palates. Sensory processing disorders can impact speech and language.

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