Executive functioning: What’s that have to do with a language disorder?

After working with students for over 13 years the one thing that continues to amaze me is the fact that so often language remediation of a language disorder has as much to do with language as it does with executive functioning including self-regulation. Here’s a site that defines and looks at executive functioning in children. http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/News/Executive-Function-Part-Six-Training-executive-function.aspx?articleID=8177&categoryID=news-type. Working with students with language disorders means teaching vocabulary, grammar, pragmatics, semantics, comprehension, but also must include instruction in how to learn.

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