Did you tell me to get rid of my accent?

I’m not saying to get rid of your accent. An accent is not a disorder; it is a normal speech pattern. The muscular pattern that was established with the first language influences other acquired languages. A speech pattern is a muscular pattern like walking; we all have a set way that we form our sounds that is unique. Instead of getting rid of the accent, the goal is to know how to “code switch.” We code switch all the time. No one speaks to their mother the same way they speak to their boss. We use different language and speech depending on whom we are speaking. The goal when reducing an accent is to be able to choose to make your speech more intelligible when it is important.

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