Speech and Language: Therapy is Play

“SORRY, I win!” Wow, perfect /s/ pronounciation! YEAH!

Play is the key to speech and language therapy when working with children and teens on developing new language skills.  SORRY for this child the game of SORRY by Hasbro provided him with the motivation to work on the articulation of the /s/.  Finally, as he won the game he produced a perfect /s/ in a short sentence.  It was definitely a win for him.

How do you motivate children and teens to work on skills repeatedly over the course of many speech and language therapy sessions? You play.  Board games, special therapy games, video games, games on ipad apps, specially created one of a kind games,  building blocks, doll houses,  bubbles, and online games are a few of the ways to play to keep children interested in improving their speech and language.

Imbedding targeted skill development into play is a strong motivator for most children.  In the case of “SORRY” sometimes the same game is used repeatedly , sometimes they are changed depending on the targeted goals. In this case.  SORRY was adapted to work at many different levels of skill development because this child preferred the game. Initially work consisted of establishing the /s/ sound. For example, start your turn with 5 /s/ repetitions.  “Now it’s my turn, listen to my /s/’s  are they being pronounced correctly.”  Not only is his speech improved, but his ear is being trained to hear the /s/ sound.  This is a critical component of articulation therapy.  Playing during therapy is an effective way to develop new speech and language skills in childre

Reference

Clayton, Darla, PsyD. “20 Things for Parents of Kids with Special Needs.”20 Things Every Parent of Kids with Special Needs Should Hear. The Mobility Resource, n.d. Web. 10 Aug. 2015.

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