Posts tagged Asperger’s syndrome

College Communication Executive-Function Coach

College Communication Executive-Function Coach

Transitioning to college from high school Some college students, at least initially, need additional support services to succeed. Not because they don’t have the academic skills, but because they aren’t able to manage their new independence in addition to academic demands.  A College Communication Executive-Function Coach (CCEFC) helps students learn to manage their lives by […]

Mindblindness vs Context blindness

Replacing the generic term of “mindblindness,” often used to refer to people on the autism spectrum, with a more specific term such as “context blindness” has been proposed by Peter Vermeulen, PhD.   Simon Baron-Cohen created the term “mindblindness,” to refer to the deficit  people on the autism spectrum have in reading others mental states. This term […]

It’s a Two Way Street: Communicating with People with Asperger Syndrome

It’s a Two Way Street: Communicating with People with Asperger Syndrome

If you missed my webinar you can listen here.  “It’s a Two Way Street: Helping the World to Communicate with People with Asperger Syndrome“ produced by AANE and presented by Kai Long, MS SLP CCC of Long on Language. This webinar will discuss society’s role in communicating with people with Asperger Syndrome (AS). Typical communication relies on […]

Yucky fiction!!! books books books

The value of reading fiction for people with Asperger Syndrome is that reading this genre offers them the opportunity to improve non-verbal skills, in spite of the fact that some people with Asperger Syndrome do not enjoy reading fictional books. 

Asperger Syndrome: Nonfiction vs Fiction

 Do people with Asperger Syndrome prefer fiction or non-fiction? It has been suggested that people with Asperger prefer nonfiction because it provides fact-based information related to their special interest. However, I have known people with Asperger syndrome who enjoyed fiction.   The lack of interest in reading fiction usually begins in childhood when children begin […]

Sensory Processing Disorder: Symptom of Autism

“I only eat Cheerios for breakfast.” says one of my clients on the autism spectrum.  People on the autism spectrum often have reduced palates. Sensory processing disorders can impact speech and language.

10 Fruits in 60 seconds: The importance of categorization

“Quick, in 60 seconds name 10 items that go in the category, fruits.”

Context Breakdown

Context involves the setting or environment surrounding a situation. People with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism are very interested in details while their deficits result in the inability to take context into consideration. This inability is noticeable in social situations as well as in their written work and verbal expression.

Facilitating Language Using Asperger Syndrome Special Interests

“I love video games and science, ” states the 11 year old with Asperger syndrome. A  characteristic of Asperger syndrome special interests can be used to facilitate language and provide career options.   Using special interests in speech-language therapy is a way to motivate clients to practice skills until mastered.

Language is Everywhere

We have all had exhausting days as parents when all we want to do is get home, but at the same time when opportunity knocks its important to seize the moment to teach our children.

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