Unidentified: Twice Exceptional Children of Color

Twice gifted children of color

Twice gifted African-American and Hispanic children

“I’m dumb!”  “I can’t learn!”  Often underserved in public schools, twice exceptional children of color,  especially children of color who are of African or Hispanic descent spend their entire academic career unidentified and underperforming. Twice exceptional is a term used to refer to students who are gifted in some areas, but also have learning disabilities as well.

“Twice-exceptional students are those who meet the eligibility criteria for both giftedness and learning disabilities. Giftedness usually pertains to high intellectual abilities or potential rather than students’ specific accomplishments. Gifted students are commonly depicted as having exceptional abilities or potential for learning and problem solving. Learning disabilities are defined as problems in learning due to a cognitive-processing difficulty in which the dysfunction affects one or more cognitive processes instead of obstructing overall intellectual ability. “  Beckley, D. (1998). Gifted and Learning Disabled: Twice-Exceptional Students. Retrieved June 27, 2015, from http://www.gifted.uconn.edu/nrcgt/newsletter/spring98/sprng984.html

For the twice-exceptional child of color the combination of tremendous strengths in some areas and great weaknesses in others, especially if language-related can cause frustration and regular homework battles. Refusal to do work, hiding work, too brief responses, and overall anxiety all can be manifestations of hidden learning difficulties which results in great, emotional turmoil.   They may read and write on grade level but have difficulty comprehending and using vocabulary, have great ideas that they are unable to get down on paper or have difficulty understanding information given orally. Gifted children of color having never benefited from the societal perception of being smart, often given to Asian and white children, quickly succumb to the idea that they are not smart and not capable of learning putting them at particular risk for developing poor skills, poor self-esteem that results in an inability to live up to their real potential.

I just love when I write a blog and then go do research and find someone saying exactly what I have seen so many times in my career. I have spent a lot of time learning to identify these children, more on that later. Here is more information on Twice-Exceptional Learners.

 

Similar posts
  • 3rd Grade Communication Goals: More than words?3rd-grade Communication Goals: It’s a pivotal year 3rd is a pivotal year for students so it’s important to know 3rd-grade communication goals. Students begin to go from learning to read to reading to learn. Often children who have been receiving speech and language services since preschool are weaned off services because they have a solid language foundation. [...]
  • Homework Support: Who Do I Choose?Identifying homework support isn’t always as easy as calling a math or English tutor.  Sometimes finding the right type of homework support is difficult because what is needed is not just help in one subject, but support for underlying weaknesses, that impact academic learning.  In order to get the right kind of help with homework, [...]
  • Speech-language therapy vs Tutoring (Updated)Speech-language therapy vs tutoring: What’s the difference? With so many support services available, understanding the difference between speech-language therapy vs tutoring is important, in order to choose the right services for yourself or your child. Speech-language therapy vs tutoring Tutors re-teach information taught in the classroom.  Students acquire information at different rates, not all master what [...]
  • Communication Problems: Fighting BackDid you know that last month was National Poetry Month? An amazing young client of mine is pen pals with this year’s National Youth Poet Laureate. My client also earned an honorable mention for her haiku in this year’s National poetry competition. She does not let communication challenges stop her. Amanda Gorman says, “I’ve been pen-palling [...]
  • Reading and Language Intervention: Should we stop now?“It is likely that children who have reading and language intervention in the primary grades will continue to need additional supplementary experiences in the upper grades as well. We know that the literacy demands are of a different nature for older children; as children proceed through the grades, they are expected to learn from informational [...]

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Subscribe

Enter your email address to receive notifications of new posts by email.