Life Long: Language-Based Learning Challenges

picnic-web
What should I do?

“My son is not confident”, says a concerned Mom at a picnic I’m attending. She goes on to say, “He seems to have difficulty understanding what people are saying and responding to them in an appropriate time frame, so he is struggling in college.”unica Continue reading “Life Long: Language-Based Learning Challenges”

Speech and Language: Therapy is Play

“SORRY, I win!” Wow, perfect /s/ pronounciation! YEAH!

Play is the key to speech and language therapy when working with children and teens on developing new language skills.  SORRY for this child the game of SORRY by Hasbro provided him with the motivation to work on the articulation of the /s/.  Finally, as he won the game he produced a perfect /s/ in a short sentence.  It was definitely a win for him.

How do you motivate children and teens to work on skills repeatedly over the course of many speech and language therapy sessions? You play.  Board games, special therapy games, video games, games on ipad apps, specially created one of a kind games,  building blocks, doll houses,  bubbles, and online games are a few of the ways to play to keep children interested in improving their speech and language.

Imbedding targeted skill development into play is a strong motivator for most children.  In the case of “SORRY” sometimes the same game is used repeatedly , sometimes they are changed depending on the targeted goals. In this case.  SORRY was adapted to work at many different levels of skill development because this child preferred the game. Initially work consisted of establishing the /s/ sound. For example, start your turn with 5 /s/ repetitions.  “Now it’s my turn, listen to my /s/’s  are they being pronounced correctly.”  Not only is his speech improved, but his ear is being trained to hear the /s/ sound.  This is a critical component of articulation therapy.  Playing during therapy is an effective way to develop new speech and language skills in childre

Reference

Clayton, Darla, PsyD. “20 Things for Parents of Kids with Special Needs.”20 Things Every Parent of Kids with Special Needs Should Hear. The Mobility Resource, n.d. Web. 10 Aug. 2015.

Accent Modification 30% Non-Verbal Language 70%

Accent modification
Accent modification improves business and academic success for people for whom English is a second language.

My client was concerned that she was passed over for a much deserved promotion because of her accent.  She said that she often avoided eating lunch with her co-workers because she rarely understood their jokes or references and she thought this might have hurt her opportunity to advance. Accent modification she felt would improve her mobility within her company. Continue reading “Accent Modification 30% Non-Verbal Language 70%”

Expressive Language Disorder or English as a Second Language

Expressive language disorders impact self -esteem
It’s never too late to get help for a language disorder.

“I have problems expressing my thoughts: Ever since the day I was born, I’ve always had problems expressing my thoughts and getting out what I wanted to say,” says the writer on  psychologist Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW,  blog on PsychCentral. Continue reading “Expressive Language Disorder or English as a Second Language”

“C” says /K/: Orton-Gillingham Reading Approach

sound-development-web
Approximate ages sounds develop

Recently, I took a 30-hour intensive refresher training in Orton-Gillingham, a preferred method of instruction for people with dyslexia, given by the Institute of Multi-Sensory Education.    Continue reading ““C” says /K/: Orton-Gillingham Reading Approach”

The Potential of a “C”: Developing a Growth Mindset

What we think about our ability to learn matters. Believing that we can only learn a fixed amount, or that others can only learn a fixed amount, does not offer anyone the opportunity to grow.  Without the belief that we can learn and grow, a “C” student can never become an “A” student. Continue reading “The Potential of a “C”: Developing a Growth Mindset”

Revealed: Twice Exceptional Learners

Twice exceptional learners may remain undiagnosed, by educational professionals including Speech Pathologist, because of their unique abilities in other areas. The language assessment in a neuropsychological battery and in some speech pathology tests often require only one-word or limited responses. Continue reading “Revealed: Twice Exceptional Learners”

Vocabulary Development: Teachable Moments

vocabulary development
Teachable moments

I am holding up a bright yellow jacket at the LL Bean outlet in New Hampshire. “Hey look this is really bright it will be great for biking,” I say to my daughter. “No, it’s dull she says!”  Continue reading “Vocabulary Development: Teachable Moments”

Unidentified: Twice Exceptional Children of Color

Twice gifted children of color
Twice gifted African-American and Hispanic children

“I’m dumb!”  “I can’t learn!”  Often underserved in public schools, twice exceptional children of color,  especially children of color who are of African or Hispanic descent spend their entire academic career unidentified and underperforming.  Continue reading “Unidentified: Twice Exceptional Children of Color”