Yucky fiction!!! books books books

The value of reading fiction for people with Asperger Syndrome is that reading this genre offers them the opportunity to improve non-verbal skills, in spite of the fact that some people with Asperger Syndrome do not enjoy reading fictional books. However, they may find comfort and interest in reading about characters with the same personality traits and …

Asperger Syndrome: Nonfiction vs Fiction

 Do people with Asperger Syndrome prefer fiction or non-fiction? It has been suggested that people with Asperger prefer nonfiction because it provides fact-based information related to their special interest. However, I have known people with Asperger syndrome who enjoyed fiction.   The lack of interest in reading fiction usually begins in childhood when children begin …

Sensory Processing Disorder: Symptom of Autism

“I only eat Cheerios for breakfast.” says one of my clients on the autism spectrum.  People on the autism spectrum often have reduced palates. Sensory processing disorders can impact speech and language.Some children are sensitive to sensory information like tags on clothing, textures of food, noise level, quality of light, and more. Sensory processing disorder is often a symptoms …

“I don’t like to…”

Pre-teens, teens, and language remediation “I don’t like to read!” says one pre-teen who is known to struggle with reading comprehension. “I don’t like to talk; I’m quiet,” says a pre-teen who struggles to formulate his ideas verbally. “Writing is stupid. Why do I have to do that? I will never use it,” says another …

Words are not enough

Vocabulary Development and Asperger Syndrome “Mama!” screamed the toddler from his crib. Usually children say their first words by 12 months,  as do some children on the autism spectrum; however, children with Asperger’s syndrome first word are often more complex than typically developing children. For example, a child with Asperger’s syndrome may say “airplane” as …

All about Categories: Resouces and games

A few resources for working with categorization at home Categories:  furniture, things,  that are green ( red, yellow), electronics, shapes colors, places people live, States, things in a classroom, transportation, things in space, nature, wild animals, living things, non-living things Dont’ forget to teach and help kids learned to think about sub-categories to improve mental flexibility. …

10 Fruits in 60 seconds: The importance of categorization

“Quick, in 60 seconds name 10 items that go in the category, fruits.”  Generally, this task for typically developing children age 10 and older, can perform this task quickly.  Categorizing information into similar items is a task we often take for granted.  However, for children with high-functioning autism and Asperger’s syndrome, classifying and sorting like …

Facilitating Language Using Asperger Syndrome Special Interests

“I love video games and science, ” states the 11 year old with Asperger syndrome. A  characteristic of Asperger syndrome special interests can be used to facilitate language and provide career options.   Using special interests in speech-language therapy is a way to motivate clients to practice skills until mastered.This benefit is not limited only …

Visualization

Creating Pictures from Words: “Along the road stood many spindly trees…” Visualization or mental images we create in our mind help us see and plan for our future, convey a story, and to comprehend. The ability to make mental images in our heads is often taken for granted, but what happens if you can’t visualize? …

Language is Everywhere

We have all had exhausting days as parents when all we want to do is get home, but at the same time when opportunity knocks its important to seize the moment to teach our children. A child lagging  behind his mother, walking home from school  today was a perfect opportunity for that mom to foster and …